Clinical Issues in Providing Speech-Language Services to Native American Children With Disabilities Numerous sources describe the obstacles that contribute to the lack of resources and effective provision of rehabilitative, educational, and medical services, including cultural and linguistic differences, jurisdictional/bureaucratic issues, and recruitment and retention of professional personnel (Harris, 1986). The challenges faced by Native American children with disabilities and their families on ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1997
Clinical Issues in Providing Speech-Language Services to Native American Children With Disabilities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine Begay Vining
    University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability, Albuquerque, NM
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1997
Clinical Issues in Providing Speech-Language Services to Native American Children With Disabilities
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 1997, Vol. 3, 4-6. doi:10.1044/cds3.3.4
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 1997, Vol. 3, 4-6. doi:10.1044/cds3.3.4
Numerous sources describe the obstacles that contribute to the lack of resources and effective provision of rehabilitative, educational, and medical services, including cultural and linguistic differences, jurisdictional/bureaucratic issues, and recruitment and retention of professional personnel (Harris, 1986). The challenges faced by Native American children with disabilities and their families on reservations are often not unique to any given tribe. McMann (1994)  reported several issues identified by advocates, consumers, Native American parents, and tribal leaders. These included:
  • lack of needed related services in both public schools and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Schools;

  • transportation difficulties as children are being transported great distances to receive intervention services, raising the issue of least restrictive environment;

  • long waiting lists for many types of evaluations, creating concerns about how children are identified;

  • a serious lack of psychological services for Native American children with behavior disorders;

  • inadequately or inappropriately informed parents who, therefore, are not fully participating in their children’s individual education plans (IEPs);

  • lack of specialists in occupational, physical, and speech intervention, causing children to be pigeonholed into existing programs.

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