Storytelling in an Urban Preschool Classroom: Reconceptualizing Narrative Analysis This article presents research on narrative production among African American preschool children for the purpose of extending previous research and discussion of narrative structure. Recently, some researchers (Champion, Katz, Mul-drow, Dail, 1999; Bloome, Champion, Katz, 1997) have been collecting data on preschool and kindergarten children’s oral and written narratives. Their ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2000
Storytelling in an Urban Preschool Classroom: Reconceptualizing Narrative Analysis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tempii B. Champion
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2000
Storytelling in an Urban Preschool Classroom: Reconceptualizing Narrative Analysis
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, December 2000, Vol. 6, 11-14. doi:10.1044/cds6.3.11
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, December 2000, Vol. 6, 11-14. doi:10.1044/cds6.3.11
This article presents research on narrative production among African American preschool children for the purpose of extending previous research and discussion of narrative structure. Recently, some researchers (Champion, Katz, Mul-drow, Dail, 1999; Bloome, Champion, Katz, 1997) have been collecting data on preschool and kindergarten children’s oral and written narratives. Their research has suggested that African American children (a) produce complex and rule-governed narratives (Labov, 1972; Michaels, 1981, 1991; Gee, 1985); (b) adopt and adapt narrative structures made available to them (Goodwin, 1990; Heath, 1983; Shuman, 1986); and (c) acquire a repertoire of narrative structures that they variously use and combine (Champion, 1995). The results of this research call into question use of coherence of text only to assess coherence in narrative construction. In the next section, I will reconsider the position of “coherence” in analyzing children’s narratives.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.