Just Genetics and You The year 2000 came and went without the catastrophes envisioned as “Y2K.” However, the year 2000 did witness at least one momentous event: the mapping of the human genome. Imagine mapping the approximately 100,000 genes on 23 pairs of human chromosomes, which means sequencing 3 billion bits of information. Imagine ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2001
Just Genetics and You
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane M. Scott
    North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2001
Just Genetics and You
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 2-4. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.2
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 2-4. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.2
The year 2000 came and went without the catastrophes envisioned as “Y2K.” However, the year 2000 did witness at least one momentous event: the mapping of the human genome. Imagine mapping the approximately 100,000 genes on 23 pairs of human chromosomes, which means sequencing 3 billion bits of information. Imagine that this information fills 1 million telephone book pages or 23 sets of the Encyclopedia Britannica. And then quit imagining, because it has been done. The human genome has been mapped; it is a first draft with some holes in it, but the human genome has been mapped.
For approximately 50% of all infants born with severe-to-profound hearing loss, the loss is due to genetic factors. Both syndromic and nonsyndromic genetic hearing losses are found, however, nonsyndromic hearing losses are more often the cause of the loss. Though there are over 400 syndromes in which hearing impairment is a characteristic of the syndrome (Keats & Berlin, 1999), 70% of congenital hearing losses are nonsyndromic losses. In examining modes of inheritance for genetic hearing losses, 77% are recessively inherited, 22% are dominantly inherited, and the rest are X-linked or mito-chondrial (Gorlin, Toriello, & Cohen, 1995). By the way, what is mitochon-drial inheritance?
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