Sickle Cell Disease and Communication Disorders The term sickle cell disease comprises a group of genetic disorders characterized by the inheritance of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) from both parents, or HbS from one parent and a gene for another abnormal hemoglobin or beta-thalassemia from the other parent (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1993). Sickle ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2001
Sickle Cell Disease and Communication Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Priscilla Nellum Davis
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Betholyn Gentry
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Jess Dancer
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2001
Sickle Cell Disease and Communication Disorders
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 4-8. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.4
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 4-8. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.4
The term sickle cell disease comprises a group of genetic disorders characterized by the inheritance of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) from both parents, or HbS from one parent and a gene for another abnormal hemoglobin or beta-thalassemia from the other parent (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1993). Sickle cell disease is a relatively newly discovered disease but has probably been around for many years. One hypothesis for its origin is that sickle hemoglobin was a genetic mutation that resulted as a response to malaria. Malaria is a deadly disease found in countries along the equator. People with the sickle cell trait are protected from malaria, while those with sickle cell anemia and normal hemoglobin are susceptible to it. Over the years the sickle cell trait has migrated to the various continents. Sickle cell disease is seen predominately in the African populations around the world but is also seen in people from other ethnic groups. These ethnic groups include individuals from parts of Asia Minor, Central India, and countries bordering the Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas.
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