Speech Materials for Testing Hearing of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children From Non-English Speaking Backgrounds An issue of national significance is that children from families in which English is not the home language constitute an increasing number of the population in residential schools for the children who are deaf and hard of hearing children (D/HOH) (Scott, 1998; Gallaudet Research Institute, 1999). For example, Moores (1992)  ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2001
Speech Materials for Testing Hearing of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children From Non-English Speaking Backgrounds
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele Proctor
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Ishara Ramkissoon
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2001
Speech Materials for Testing Hearing of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children From Non-English Speaking Backgrounds
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 8-10. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.8
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, April 2001, Vol. 7, 8-10. doi:10.1044/cds7.1.8
An issue of national significance is that children from families in which English is not the home language constitute an increasing number of the population in residential schools for the children who are deaf and hard of hearing children (D/HOH) (Scott, 1998; Gallaudet Research Institute, 1999). For example, Moores (1992)  found 40% of the population in a large program for children who are deaf were from families in which English was not the first language. Moores also reported that one could readily identify, in both residential and day programs, 12- to 14-year-old recently immigrated children who are deaf and who had had no previous education. According to the Gallaudet Research Institute (1999), 45.2% of the children in the United States who are deaf and hard of hearing (D/HOH) are ethnic minorities. Of this total, 17% are African American, 20.4% are Latino, 4.2% are Asian American/Pacific Islander, .8% is Native American, and 3.1% cite other or multiethnic background.
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