Beyond Words: Multimedia for Speech-Language Pathologists Traditional text–based teaching methods appear slow and one–dimensional when compared to fast–paced multimedia materials. Multimedia technology integrates speech, text, graphics, sound, video, animation, and special effects to convey meaning (El–Hindi & Leu, 1998; Hallett, in press). Digital computers have made multimedia presentations a part of our daily experience of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2001
Beyond Words: Multimedia for Speech-Language Pathologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry L. Hallett
    University of Akron, Akron, OH
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2001
Beyond Words: Multimedia for Speech-Language Pathologists
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2001, Vol. 7, 2-4. doi:10.1044/cds7.3.2
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2001, Vol. 7, 2-4. doi:10.1044/cds7.3.2
Traditional text–based teaching methods appear slow and one–dimensional when compared to fast–paced multimedia materials. Multimedia technology integrates speech, text, graphics, sound, video, animation, and special effects to convey meaning (El–Hindi & Leu, 1998; Hallett, in press). Digital computers have made multimedia presentations a part of our daily experience of television, the Internet, and video games. In spite of this, our concept of knowledge remains textual. Ironically, this may be partially attributable to the very linear thinking utilized (and therefore encouraged) by text–based methods.
The relationship between literacy and knowledge is historical. Prior to the development of the printing press, widespread literacy was unthinkable (Walker, 1999). The availability of inexpensive printed material changed the very meaning of knowledge, as reflected in the following dictionary definition:

literate 1. able to read and write 2. well–educated; having or showing extensive knowledge, learning, or culture 3. versed in literature 4. knowledgeable or capable (Agnes, 1999)

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