Coordinator's Corner Stuttering is the focus of this issue of Perspectives. Stuttering is a communication disorder that has probably generated more research and discussion than almost any other in our field. As early as the 1920s, researchers at the University of Iowa began posing and investigating questions related to the causes and ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   July 01, 2002
Coordinator's Corner
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Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   July 01, 2002
Coordinator's Corner
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 1-2. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.1
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 1-2. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.1
Stuttering is the focus of this issue of Perspectives. Stuttering is a communication disorder that has probably generated more research and discussion than almost any other in our field. As early as the 1920s, researchers at the University of Iowa began posing and investigating questions related to the causes and characteristics of speech disfluency. Some of the theories developed from that research have stood the test of time and stand as cornerstones of the current thinking about stuttering. According to Guitar (1998), Travis’ early characterization of stuttering as a neurophysiological disorder is still valid as a result of additional research that has led to the incorporation of learning theory and additional knowledge about speech production into his original theory. Van Riper’s notion of “core behaviors” as the essence of stuttering is imbedded in the literature and current thinking of many speech-language pathologists. However, just as some theories and approaches have stood the test of time, others have not. Our thinking and knowledge about stuttering, its causes, character, and approaches to the establishment of fluency have continued to change as new ideas in all these areas have been created and tested. And what about the notion of diversity in communication fluency? People who stutter are found in all cultures, languages, genders, lifestyles, professions, religions, and ages. Indeed, stuttering may be the most equal opportunity communication disorder there is.
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