Transmission of Stuttering Stuttering has been recognized as a familially transmitted disorder since the beginning of modern stuttering research. Both genetic factors and the environment have been implicated in the cause and maintenance of stuttering. With the completion of the human genome project, a definite thrust in the study of the genetic aspects ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2002
Transmission of Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anu Subramanian
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2002
Transmission of Stuttering
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 2-5. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.2
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 2-5. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.2
Stuttering has been recognized as a familially transmitted disorder since the beginning of modern stuttering research. Both genetic factors and the environment have been implicated in the cause and maintenance of stuttering. With the completion of the human genome project, a definite thrust in the study of the genetic aspects of stuttering is evident. This paper will discuss a brief history of research in the area of genetics and stuttering, including the different techniques used to study these relationships. Finally, I will mention the salient points of my dissertation (Subramanian, 2001) related to genetics and stuttering.
Historically, familial transmission of stuttering has been reported since the 1930s. Bryngelson and Rutherford (1937)  were among the first to report that 46% of the 74 stuttering children they studied had a positive family history of stuttering. In comparison, among the 74 non-stuttering children, familial incidence of stuttering was found to be 18%. Wepman (1939)  reported on the incidence of stuttering in the families of 250 individuals who stutter and 250 non-stuttering controls. The incidence percentage in the first group was 69% and only 15.6% for the control group. In a similar study, West, Nelson and Berry (1939)  reported a positive history of stuttering in the families of 51% of the individuals who stutter with only 18% of non-stuttering individuals reporting such histories.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.