Multicultural Aspects of Stuttering For years, the United States was considered to be a melting pot, where people from different countries and multicultural backgrounds lived a homogeneous existence. The melting pot phenomenon, however, may not be a true representation of American society. According to Green (1982), American society is now a transactional entity where ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2002
Multicultural Aspects of Stuttering
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Glen M. Tellis
    Department of Special Education and Clinical Services, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2002
Multicultural Aspects of Stuttering
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 8-11. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.8
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2002, Vol. 8, 8-11. doi:10.1044/cds8.2.8
For years, the United States was considered to be a melting pot, where people from different countries and multicultural backgrounds lived a homogeneous existence. The melting pot phenomenon, however, may not be a true representation of American society. According to Green (1982), American society is now a transactional entity where individuals identify with certain ethnic and cultural groups, while recognizing and participating in the larger society. These cultural groups are reflected in the latest U.S. Census data. For example, from the total United States population of 284 million, there are 194 million white non-Hispanics, 33.9 million African Americans, 35.3 million Hispanic Americans, and 10.1 million Asian Americans (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000). These are the largest of the culturally diverse groups. Apart from these groups, today’s American society consists of other multicultural populations, including but not limited to Native-Americans (and the Alaskan tribes) and Pacific Islanders, South Asians, and a multitude of linguistically diverse speakers.
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