Assessment and Treatment of Neurological Impairments in African Americans: Sociocultural Considerations Information about the sociocultural factors that can affect clinical service provision to African Americans with neurological impairments is limited in the communication sciences and disorders literature. Yet, there is a high prevalence of speech and hearing disorders among racial-ethnic minorities, with racial-ethnic minorities making up more that a third of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Assessment and Treatment of Neurological Impairments in African Americans: Sociocultural Considerations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Constance Dean Qualls
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Assessment and Treatment of Neurological Impairments in African Americans: Sociocultural Considerations
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2002, Vol. 8, 9-13. doi:10.1044/cds8.3.9
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2002, Vol. 8, 9-13. doi:10.1044/cds8.3.9
Information about the sociocultural factors that can affect clinical service provision to African Americans with neurological impairments is limited in the communication sciences and disorders literature. Yet, there is a high prevalence of speech and hearing disorders among racial-ethnic minorities, with racial-ethnic minorities making up more that a third of speech-language pathologist caseloads (ASHA, Omnibus Survey, http://professional.asha.org/resources/omnibus/index.cfm); Approximately 21 in every 1,000 African Americans ages 45–64 are living with a speech or language impairment (Adams, Hendershot, & Marano, 1999). These numbers are likely due to the increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease in African Americans (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2002). Furthermore, of the more than 107,000 member affiliates of ASHA, only slightly less than 5% are members of a racial minority (ASHA, Omnibus Survey). This demographic landscape has considerable implications for service delivery to African Americans with neurological communication impairments.
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