Coordinator's Corner The Graying of America is a term we've all heard. It refers to the fact that the largest segment of the American population, the baby boomer generation, is aging. That has profound implications for America. Approximately 20% of Americans are over 65 years old, and people over 100 years ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   July 01, 2003
Coordinator's Corner
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Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   July 01, 2003
Coordinator's Corner
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 1-2. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.1
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 1-2. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.1
The Graying of America is a term we've all heard. It refers to the fact that the largest segment of the American population, the baby boomer generation, is aging. That has profound implications for America. Approximately 20% of Americans are over 65 years old, and people over 100 years of age are the fastest growing demographic in the nation. In 1990, there were approximately 30 million Americans who were 85 and older. In 2050, there are projected to be approximately 75 million Americans in this age category—an increase of 60%. Elders between the ages of 75 and 84 years will increase by 55% between 1990 and 2050, and elders 65 to 74 will increase by 40% during the same period. Thanks to better health care, improved livening conditions, and healthier lifestyles, Americans are experiencing increased longevity. The aging of America has a myriad of implications. In 2000, 15% of the population 65 and over were nonwhite. By 2025, 25% of the elderly will be non-white. By 2050, 35% are likely to be nonwhite. All Americans don't “gray” in the same way. African-Americans and Hispanics may not experience aging in the same way. In their respective ethnic communities, the same standard of behavior may not be acceptable for the Native American grandmother as for the Vietnamese elder who immigrated to America 10 years ago. There are cultural aspects of aging.
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