What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Therapist Needs to Know About Deaf Culture This article provides audiologists and speech-language therapists working with Deaf people insight into the culture in which their clients live. The components of Deaf culture and American Sign Language (ASL) will be discussed. The goal is to promote a better understanding of this linguistic and cultural minority resulting in ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2003
What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Therapist Needs to Know About Deaf Culture
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arlene Blumenthal Kelly
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • Editor's Note: This article was written by and reflects the perspectives of Dr. Arlene Kelly, a culturally Deaf faculty member in the Department of ASL and Deaf Studies at Gallaudet University. It was written in consultation with, and was edited and formatted by Susanne Scott, a clinical aural rehabilitationist in the Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology at Gallaudet University.
    Editor's Note: This article was written by and reflects the perspectives of Dr. Arlene Kelly, a culturally Deaf faculty member in the Department of ASL and Deaf Studies at Gallaudet University. It was written in consultation with, and was edited and formatted by Susanne Scott, a clinical aural rehabilitationist in the Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology at Gallaudet University.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2003
What Every Audiologist and Speech-Language Therapist Needs to Know About Deaf Culture
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 3-9. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.3
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 3-9. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.3
This article provides audiologists and speech-language therapists working with Deaf people insight into the culture in which their clients live. The components of Deaf culture and American Sign Language (ASL) will be discussed. The goal is to promote a better understanding of this linguistic and cultural minority resulting in improved relations and service delivery.
As history and experience shows us, at the heart of every community is its language (Baker-Shenk & Cokely, 1980). The phenomenon known as Deaf culture consists of a community of people who use sign language, or ASL if in North America, primarily to communicate. (Note: I use “Deaf” to refer to social collectiveness and attitudes, and “deaf” to refer to the audiological condition. This distinction was offered by Woodward [1972]  and supported by Padden & Humphries [1988] .)
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