Culturally Sensitive Audiologic Protocol With Culturally Deaf Children As audiologists address the needs of families from a variety of racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds that differ from their own, one hopes they consider the varying cultural perspectives and language use differences inherent in these diverse groups. Deaf culture also encompasses specific characteristics to consider which may influence ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2003
Culturally Sensitive Audiologic Protocol With Culturally Deaf Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Marshall
    LeClerc Center, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • Jennifer Helsel
    LeClerc Center, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2003
Culturally Sensitive Audiologic Protocol With Culturally Deaf Children
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 9-12. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.9
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2003, Vol. 9, 9-12. doi:10.1044/cds9.1.9
As audiologists address the needs of families from a variety of racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds that differ from their own, one hopes they consider the varying cultural perspectives and language use differences inherent in these diverse groups. Deaf culture also encompasses specific characteristics to consider which may influence audiologic assessment. When individuals have grown up within the Deaf culture, they often view hearing loss as part of their identity and not a communication disorder.
American Sign Language is a visual language uniting many persons within Deaf culture, for whom use of hearing aids and other assistive listening technologies hold varying levels of interest. The unique language and communication beliefs of this group related to hearing and hearing loss may affect the assessment procedures used, counseling techniques applied, technologies chosen, and recommendations made by audiologists. This article will discuss considerations and strategies for providing an audiologic protocol to use with culturally Deaf families gathered through the combined 35 years of experience of the authors working at the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University, as well as other schools serving Deaf children and their families.
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