Cultural Variables Affecting Research With Native American Populations Politicians, educators, medical personnel, and researchers are aware of the increasing numbers of individuals from diverse cultures. Both the United States Department of Education and the National Institutes of Health require that researchers address the issues and needs of these diverse populations in proposals. Typically, when one thinks of ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
Cultural Variables Affecting Research With Native American Populations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol Westby
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Christine Begay Vining
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2004
Cultural Variables Affecting Research With Native American Populations
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2004, Vol. 11, 3-17. doi:10.1044/cds11.1.3
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2004, Vol. 11, 3-17. doi:10.1044/cds11.1.3
Politicians, educators, medical personnel, and researchers are aware of the increasing numbers of individuals from diverse cultures. Both the United States Department of Education and the National Institutes of Health require that researchers address the issues and needs of these diverse populations in proposals. Typically, when one thinks of diversity within the United States, one thinks of African-American and Hispanic groups and perhaps Asians or refugees from areas of current regional conflicts in the world (e.g., Afghan or Bosnian refugees). For those not living near reservations or in areas with sizeable Native American populations, however, there has often been little awareness of the existence of Native Americans. In recent years, tribal efforts to reclaim lost lands and artifacts and to claim tribal sovereignty for legal and educational matters including gambling rights, hunting and fishing rights, and religious freedoms have made mainstream America more aware of the Native American presence. Considerable misunderstanding and stereotyping of Native Americans; however, continues (Hirschfelder, Molin, & Wakim, 1999; Thornton, 1998).
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