An Examination of Research Issues in Hearing for Children From Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations An audiologist proceeds through four steps in evaluating a child's hearing abilities: Identifying the existence of a hearing impairment, Determining the degree of impairment, Assessing the impairment's impact on the child's communication ability, and Planning and providing (re) habilitative treatment, including fitting amplification devices, conducting auditory training, and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
An Examination of Research Issues in Hearing for Children From Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane M. Scott
    North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
An Examination of Research Issues in Hearing for Children From Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2004, Vol. 11, 2-12. doi:10.1044/cds11.3.2
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2004, Vol. 11, 2-12. doi:10.1044/cds11.3.2
An audiologist proceeds through four steps in evaluating a child's hearing abilities:
  1. Identifying the existence of a hearing impairment,

  2. Determining the degree of impairment,

  3. Assessing the impairment's impact on the child's communication ability, and

  4. Planning and providing (re) habilitative treatment, including fitting amplification devices, conducting auditory training, and counseling and supporting the child and her family.

What if each of these steps needs to be modified based on differences among culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) populations? Questions to be considered include:
  • Are there differences in prevalence rates of hearing impairment among CLD populations? If so, why?

  • What do histopathological studies reveal?

  • How many histopathological studies have been performed or conducted with subjects from CLD populations?

  • Our ever-increasing knowledge base in genetics has already changed the way etiology of hearing loss is being identified. Do race and/or culture influence the manifestation of a genetic hearing impairment?

  • Do audiologists know what affect culture may have on the support services provided by them?

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