The Case for Bilingual Intervention for Typical and Atypical Language Learners The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of providing dual language stimulation to children living in the United States whose families speak languages other than, or in addition to, English. In this article I use the term “bilingual” to refer to children who have input in ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2005
The Case for Bilingual Intervention for Typical and Atypical Language Learners
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Adelaida Restrepo
    Speech and Hearing Science Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2005
The Case for Bilingual Intervention for Typical and Atypical Language Learners
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2005, Vol. 12, 13-17. doi:10.1044/cds12.2.13
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2005, Vol. 12, 13-17. doi:10.1044/cds12.2.13
The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of providing dual language stimulation to children living in the United States whose families speak languages other than, or in addition to, English. In this article I use the term “bilingual” to refer to children who have input in two languages, such as Spanish and English, beginning during infancy. I refer to children whose primary experience is in a language other than English until they enter the formal educational system as English language learners (ELL). Three types of evidence will be used to make the case for supporting the first or native language as well as English during intervention with typical and atypical learners. The first type of evidence I discuss is the generally positive effect of bilingual educational programs on academic performance for typical learners of English as a second language. The second line of evidence emphasizes the importance of strong native language abilities for the attainment of skills in a second language. Finally, I will use results from recent intervention studies with bilinguals with and without language impairment to make the case for supporting native language skills in children with atypical language development.
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