Ethnolinguistic Variations in Communication With Elderly Persons Who Have Alzheimer's Disease The number of Americans over 65 years of age is estimated to double and the number over 85 to triple over the next four decades, with populations from minority backgrounds increasing at the highest rates (Ross, 2000). In health-care settings, speech-language pathologists' caseloads carry increasing numbers of elderly persons ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Ethnolinguistic Variations in Communication With Elderly Persons Who Have Alzheimer's Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlene Pope
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Ethnolinguistic Variations in Communication With Elderly Persons Who Have Alzheimer's Disease
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2005, Vol. 12, 14-21. doi:10.1044/cds12.3.14
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2005, Vol. 12, 14-21. doi:10.1044/cds12.3.14
The number of Americans over 65 years of age is estimated to double and the number over 85 to triple over the next four decades, with populations from minority backgrounds increasing at the highest rates (Ross, 2000). In health-care settings, speech-language pathologists' caseloads carry increasing numbers of elderly persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or cognitive impairment. In the United States, the prevalence of AD ranges from 5–10% in those from 65 to 85 years of age to as high as 45% in those over 85 years of age (U.S. General Accounting Office, 1998), with prevalence expected to rise with projected increases in the aging population. Prior to assessing speech, hearing, or language disorders in the growing elderly minority population, clinicians begin with a focus on problem identification and deviations (Tomblin, 2000). Based on limited previous research, clinicians who assess their clients' communication based on their personal expectations and language use from their speech communities lack sufficient evidence to evaluate variations with elder minority patients.
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