Social Networks Approach for Persons With Aphasia The practice of including both the person with aphasia and their family members/friends in the assessment and therapy process for purposes of improving meaningful communication and well being is a central tenet of the “Life Participation Approach to Aphasia” as described by Chapey and her colleagues (2000)  as well ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Social Networks Approach for Persons With Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Candace Vickers
    St. Jude Medical Center, Fullerton, CA
  • Darla Hagge
    St. Jude Medical Center, Fullerton, CA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Social Networks Approach for Persons With Aphasia
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2005, Vol. 12, 6-14. doi:10.1044/cds12.3.6
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2005, Vol. 12, 6-14. doi:10.1044/cds12.3.6
The practice of including both the person with aphasia and their family members/friends in the assessment and therapy process for purposes of improving meaningful communication and well being is a central tenet of the “Life Participation Approach to Aphasia” as described by Chapey and her colleagues (2000)  as well as Simmons-Mackie (1998; 2001). Specifically, a term that may be used to denote a person's group of current and potential communication partners, including family members and friends, is social networks. It follows then, that purposeful consideration of individuals' social networks is an essential feature of providing culturally specific and sensitive interventions, since both communication activities, roles, patterns as well as reactions to pain and disability may be embedded within an individual's culture (Gudykunst & Lee, 2001; Morris, 1986; Zhang & Bennett, 2001). Culturally competent assessment and individual therapy procedures for persons with aphasia from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds as well as information about patterns of recovery in bilingual aphasia have been addressed by several authors (ASHA, 2004, in press; Baker, 2000; Battle, 2000; Boles, 2003; Centeno, 2005; Grosjean, 1989; Roberts, 2001). These authors discuss the challenges of trying to provide appropriate intervention, including consideration of family structures, for persons from CLD backgrounds. Recognition of the importance of understanding the environment in which persons with aphasia interact has led to more emphasis on the importance of increasing participation in life through avenues, such as incorporating partner training of both family members (Boles, 1998a, 1998b, 2000; Lock, Wilkinson, & Bryan, 2001; Lyon, 1998) and volunteers who serve as conversation partners (Kagan, 1995; 1998; Kagan & Gailey, 1993; Lyon et al., 1997; Vickers, 1998, 2004).
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