Perception of Accented Speech: A Summary of the Research The perception of accented speech has been researched as early as the 1970s (Ryan & Carranza, 1975) and continues to be an area of investigation today (Burda & Hageman, 2005; Burda, Scherz, Hageman, & Edwards, 2003). Perception of accented speech actually encompasses two broad areas. One area of perception ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2006
Perception of Accented Speech: A Summary of the Research
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela N. Burda Riess
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2006
Perception of Accented Speech: A Summary of the Research
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2006, Vol. 13, 3-7. doi:10.1044/cds13.2.3
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 2006, Vol. 13, 3-7. doi:10.1044/cds13.2.3
The perception of accented speech has been researched as early as the 1970s (Ryan & Carranza, 1975) and continues to be an area of investigation today (Burda & Hageman, 2005; Burda, Scherz, Hageman, & Edwards, 2003). Perception of accented speech actually encompasses two broad areas. One area of perception pertains to listeners' attitudes towards speakers (Kalin & Rayko, 1978; Ryan & Carranza, 1975). Another area of perception refers to whether or not listeners understand what the speakers are saying (Burda, et al., 2003; Munro & Derwing, 1995a, 1995b). Past studies on this topic typically have had participants listen to and rate or transcribe native and non-native English speakers. Both native and non-native English speakers have been listeners (Derwing & Munro, 1997; Ryan & Carranza) although some studies have included only native English speakers as listeners (Burda et al., 2003; Munro & Derwing, 1995a, 1995b). Recent investigations have studied older adults' (age 60+) understanding of accented speech (Burda & Hageman, 2005; Burda et al., 2003). Additional studies have examined whether or not topic familiarity or familiarity with accented speech aids native English speakers' comprehension of accented speech (Derwing & Munro; Gass & Varonis, 1984). Readers may not be familiar with the body of literature pertaining to the perception of accented speech. This article will provide a brief review of studies on this topic. This is not an exhaustive list and readers are encouraged to contact the author for additional information.
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