Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Working Together to Serve Children in Rural Communities Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing Most individuals currently practicing in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology come from common academic backgrounds—that is, they have undergraduate degrees in communication sciences and disorders and graduate degrees in one of the two professions. However, we cannot assume that these “sister” professions will automatically and easily collaborate. ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2006
Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Working Together to Serve Children in Rural Communities Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Fisher Smiley
    University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR
  • Travis Threats
    Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2006
Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Working Together to Serve Children in Rural Communities Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2006, Vol. 13, 24-28. doi:10.1044/cds13.3.24
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2006, Vol. 13, 24-28. doi:10.1044/cds13.3.24
Most individuals currently practicing in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology come from common academic backgrounds—that is, they have undergraduate degrees in communication sciences and disorders and graduate degrees in one of the two professions. However, we cannot assume that these “sister” professions will automatically and easily collaborate. This may become more of a problem as some encourage the separation of audiology and speech-language pathology at the national level in terms of certification and affiliation with professional organizations. However, the purpose of this article is to encourage, and provide justification for, a stronger and more formal collaboration between members of the professions. This article will discuss collaboration in providing services to children who are deaf/hard of hearing and live in rural communities.
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