Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Europe: The Role of CPLOL and Its Relevance to Education Regarding Cultural Diversity in the United States The current growth in multilingual and multicultural populations, and therefore the pluralism of the United States, is predicted to continue (United States Census Bureau, 2004). This increasing diversity also is occurring in Europe (Grillo, 2006a, 2006b). Within this growing diversity in the United States and Europe, the number of children ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Europe: The Role of CPLOL and Its Relevance to Education Regarding Cultural Diversity in the United States
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Birgitta Rosén-Gustafsson
    Standing Liaison Committee of EU Speech and Language Therapists and Logopedists, Comité Permanent de Liaison des Orthophonistes-Logopèdes de l'Union Européenne, Paris, France
  • Lynette R. Goldberg
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Europe: The Role of CPLOL and Its Relevance to Education Regarding Cultural Diversity in the United States
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2007, Vol. 14, 8-11. doi:10.1044/cds14.1.8
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2007, Vol. 14, 8-11. doi:10.1044/cds14.1.8
The current growth in multilingual and multicultural populations, and therefore the pluralism of the United States, is predicted to continue (United States Census Bureau, 2004). This increasing diversity also is occurring in Europe (Grillo, 2006a, 2006b). Within this growing diversity in the United States and Europe, the number of children and adults from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds who need effective assessment and intervention for communication difficulties is increasing steadily (ASHA, 2005a; Kalf, 2006). Adding to the complexity of this issue, the languages spoken by bilingual and multilingual clinicians in the European Union (EU), in many instances, are not the primary languages of those who need intervention (Kalf). A parallel is evident in the overwhelming majority of Caucasian and monolingual clinicians in the United States (ASHA, 2004; 2005a). Data from national surveys conducted by ASHA (2004, 2005a, 2005b) document how critical it is for speech-language pathologists to be competent in providing services to individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and to be aware of the complexity of the issues in such service provision.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.