Infants and Toddlers Adopted Abroad: Clinical Practices Recently, adoption of children from foreign countries has increased significantly. Between 2001 and 2006 over 126,000 visas were issued for children adopted from other countries (U.S. Department of State, 2006). In 2006 alone, 19,797 children entered the U.S. (U.S. Department of State, 2006). Angelina Jolie’s and Madonna’s highly publicized adoptions ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Infants and Toddlers Adopted Abroad: Clinical Practices
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah A. Hwa-Froelich
    Saint Louis University, St. Louis. MO
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / International & Global / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Infants and Toddlers Adopted Abroad: Clinical Practices
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2007, Vol. 14, 9-12. doi:10.1044/cds14.3.9
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2007, Vol. 14, 9-12. doi:10.1044/cds14.3.9
Recently, adoption of children from foreign countries has increased significantly. Between 2001 and 2006 over 126,000 visas were issued for children adopted from other countries (U.S. Department of State, 2006). In 2006 alone, 19,797 children entered the U.S. (U.S. Department of State, 2006). Angelina Jolie’s and Madonna’s highly publicized adoptions have added to the public’s interest and acceptance of this practice (Associated Press, January 15, 2007; March 15, 2007).
Children adopted from foreign countries raise developmental issues in communication because the adopting families often do not speak the same language or have the same cultural practices as the children’s country of origin. Children who have been adopted have been exposed to one set of cultural and linguistic interactions and stimuli and are abruptly moved into a different culture and language of communication. Language development for these children differs from multilingual children who remain exposed to multiple languages and cultures. Case studies of children, who after adoption are removed from one linguistic and cultural background to another, provide evidence that they often lose their first language within the first year, acculturating to their new adoptive culture and language quickly (Anderson, 1999; Glennen & Masters, 2002; Nicoladis & Grabois, 2002).
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