Collaborating With Tribal Communities and Families to Improve the Social, Emotional, and Linguistic Competence of Young Indigenous Children Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of an innovative community based participatory based research partnership between a university researcher and a tribal Head Start program. This initiative is aimed at improving communicative competence of young Indigenous children while simultaneously decreasing challenging behaviors. Method: The use ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2008
Collaborating With Tribal Communities and Families to Improve the Social, Emotional, and Linguistic Competence of Young Indigenous Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan C. Faircloth
    The Pennsylvania State University/UCLA Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles, University Park, PA/Los Angeles, CA
  • Robert Pfeffer
    Seneca Nation Tribal Head Start DirectorIrving, NY
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2008
Collaborating With Tribal Communities and Families to Improve the Social, Emotional, and Linguistic Competence of Young Indigenous Children
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2008, Vol. 15, 19-26. doi:10.1044/cds15.1.19
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2008, Vol. 15, 19-26. doi:10.1044/cds15.1.19
Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of an innovative community based participatory based research partnership between a university researcher and a tribal Head Start program. This initiative is aimed at improving communicative competence of young Indigenous children while simultaneously decreasing challenging behaviors.

Method: The use of community based participatory research is presented as a potential model that speech-language pathologists might follow in developing and implementing interventions when working with indigenous children and families. The article includes recommendations for working collaboratively with schools, early education providers, and communities using lessons learned from the emerging partnership between a university researcher and a tribal Head Start program. Recommendations are made regarding the modification and, when appropriate, the development of speech-language interventions aimed at improving communicative competence, emergent literacy, and social and emotional behavior in both therapeutic and home environments.

Conclusion: This article is useful for speech-language pathologists who are working to develop and implement culturally and linguistically appropriate speech-language interventions for use in early childhood education and home-based programs in Indigenous communities.

Acknowledgments
The first author would like to acknowledge and thank the Seneca Nation and tribal Head Start program for their willingness to welcome her into the community and to engage in the collaborative research process. This study presents an exciting opportunity to examine local nuances involved in the development and implementation of culturally appropriate interventions.
We would also like to acknowledge the American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start Research Center at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center and the Administration for Children and Families. This work was made possible by funding from these organizations.
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