Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People: An Introductory Discussion of Terminology and Demographics Purpose: The primary objective of the current paper is to present an overview of the terminology and demographic data pertaining to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) population within the United States and to increase awareness of the cultural trends that affect the clinician's ability to effectively operate in ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2009
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People: An Introductory Discussion of Terminology and Demographics
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. G. Steckly
    Private practice, San Antonio, TX
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Transgender / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2009
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender People: An Introductory Discussion of Terminology and Demographics
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2009, Vol. 16, 4-10. doi:10.1044/cds16.1.4
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2009, Vol. 16, 4-10. doi:10.1044/cds16.1.4
Abstract

Purpose: The primary objective of the current paper is to present an overview of the terminology and demographic data pertaining to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) population within the United States and to increase awareness of the cultural trends that affect the clinician's ability to effectively operate in cross-cultural situations.

Method: Current literature and internet sources were used to gather terminology and demographic information. Applicable terminology was identified, and analysis of data related to demographic trends was performed.

Results: With improved census data collection since 1990, more accurate data to describe the GLBT population are now available. Current census data continue to omit single gay men, single lesbian women, and bisexual and transgender people. Same-sex couple populations in the United States were better identified in the 2000 census.

Conclusions: Data limitations discussed. Implications for practice and research are presented.

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