Early Intervention Services With American Indian Tribes in New Mexico Abstract: Abstract  Typical approaches to early intervention services, as carried out in many parts of the United States, may not be practical or successful with traditional American Indian families and ... Article
Article  |   October 2009
Early Intervention Services With American Indian Tribes in New Mexico
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mette J. Pedersen
    Center for Development & Disability Health Sciences Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
  • Christine B. Vining
    Center for Development & Disability Health Sciences Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Early Identification & Intervention
Article   |   October 2009
Early Intervention Services With American Indian Tribes in New Mexico
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2009, Vol. 16, 86-94. doi:10.1044/cds16.3.86
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, October 2009, Vol. 16, 86-94. doi:10.1044/cds16.3.86
Abstract:

Abstract  Typical approaches to early intervention services, as carried out in many parts of the United States, may not be practical or successful with traditional American Indian families and communities. New Mexico, home to 22 tribes (19 pueblos, Navajo, and 2 Apache tribes) with eight indigenous languages, has worked through its Part C Family Infant Toddler (FIT) Program to support services for all communities in ways that meet community and cultural norms. This has led to examination of service delivery approaches, community based services guided by local American Indian leadership, and scrutiny of early assessment and evaluation in a culturally appropriate manner, compatible with state and federal regulation. This overview of the early intervention system, its challenges and opportunities, shares features of early intervention programs serving New Mexico tribes, and speech-language services in the context of family-centered philosophy, and culturally competent service delivery.

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