Interpreting the “Sounds of Silence” in Dual Language Preschools in Qatar: Teacher's Use of Story Retelling and Language Sampling Analysis of English and Arabic story retelling in eight dual-language preschool classrooms in Qatar indicated that this method might provide useful data for monitoring children at risk for language delay. Language samples, elicited by teachers during five repeated story-retelling sessions, were obtained from a larger study of the vocabulary data ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2010
Interpreting the “Sounds of Silence” in Dual Language Preschools in Qatar: Teacher's Use of Story Retelling and Language Sampling
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen L. Kelly
    Supreme Education CouncilDoha, Qatar
    Walden University, USA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / International & Global / Language Disorders / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2010
Interpreting the “Sounds of Silence” in Dual Language Preschools in Qatar: Teacher's Use of Story Retelling and Language Sampling
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2010, Vol. 17, 11-24. doi:10.1044/cds17.1.11
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, March 2010, Vol. 17, 11-24. doi:10.1044/cds17.1.11
Abstract

Analysis of English and Arabic story retelling in eight dual-language preschool classrooms in Qatar indicated that this method might provide useful data for monitoring children at risk for language delay. Language samples, elicited by teachers during five repeated story-retelling sessions, were obtained from a larger study of the vocabulary data of 157 children. Measures of language productivity included analysis of Total Utterances (TU) and number of Different Word Roots (DWR). Results revealed that 13% of the children who gave no response (NR) in English during the initial session were still non-productive 4 months later, at mid-year. Twenty-one percent of the children demonstrated English DWR more than 1 standard deviation below class means at mid-year and 17% remained below the mean at the end of the year. Review of concurrent Arabic language sampling at mid-year revealed that 7% of the children were non-productive in both languages and 13% achieved Arabic DWR levels that were more than 1 standard deviation below their class mean, with minimal change noted at the end of the year (12%), in spite of daily Arabic and English instruction. Recommendations are offered for SLP-supervised language sampling that facilitates dual language instruction in early childhood classrooms.

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