Article Review: Cuando el maestro no habla español: Children's bilingual language practices in the classroom Article abstracted and reviewed by Megan Neely, Student at Mankato State University. This study reports the language use and practices of a fourth grade classroom with a teacher identified as minimally Spanish-proficient. According to the authors, children who learn two languages have increased resources. If bilingual children are able to ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   February 01, 1997
Article Review: Cuando el maestro no habla español: Children's bilingual language practices in the classroom
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan Neely
    Mankato State University
    Student
Article Information
Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   February 01, 1997
Article Review: Cuando el maestro no habla español: Children's bilingual language practices in the classroom
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, February 1997, Vol. 3, 18-19. doi:10.1044/cds3.1.18
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, February 1997, Vol. 3, 18-19. doi:10.1044/cds3.1.18
Article abstracted and reviewed by Megan Neely, Student at Mankato State University.
This study reports the language use and practices of a fourth grade classroom with a teacher identified as minimally Spanish-proficient. According to the authors, children who learn two languages have increased resources. If bilingual children are able to maintain their native language abilities, then they will be able to benefit from certain social and economic rewards. Overall, U.S. schools do not consider development and maintenance of native language abilities to be primary. The main aims of federal bilingual programs are to foster English language proficiency for bilingual children so they may be able to transition, or mainstream, into English-only classrooms. The authors wish to identify where schools fit into native language maintenance and how the monolingual teacher’s language abilities affect the child’s native language.
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