A Comparison of the Code-Switching Abilities of Aphasic and Neurologically Intact Bilinguals Code-switching is a socially and grammatically rule-governed alternation between languages across and within contexts (Aguirre, 1988). Bilinguals must code-switch in order to communicate effectively and efficiently; therefore, one must understand how aphasia impacts code-switching. Researchers tend to indicate that aphasia does not impair a bilinguals’ ability to code-switch (Hyltenstam, 1995). ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1997
A Comparison of the Code-Switching Abilities of Aphasic and Neurologically Intact Bilinguals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria L. Muñoz
    University of Texas-Austin
  • Gary Copeland
    University of Texas-Austin
  • Thomas Marquardt
    University of Texas-Austin
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 1997
A Comparison of the Code-Switching Abilities of Aphasic and Neurologically Intact Bilinguals
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 1997, Vol. 3, 10-11. doi:10.1044/cds3.2.10
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 1997, Vol. 3, 10-11. doi:10.1044/cds3.2.10
Code-switching is a socially and grammatically rule-governed alternation between languages across and within contexts (Aguirre, 1988). Bilinguals must code-switch in order to communicate effectively and efficiently; therefore, one must understand how aphasia impacts code-switching. Researchers tend to indicate that aphasia does not impair a bilinguals’ ability to code-switch (Hyltenstam, 1995). However, this conclusion is premature, given limitations in the data on which it is based (Hyltenstam). Evidence that code-switching is potentially impaired in bilinguals with aphasia is seen in language mixing, or the inappropriate mixing of two or more languages, which is said to occur frequently among bilingual with aphasia (Paradis, 1995). However, the identification of language mixing has been called into question due, to the lack of differentiation between normal code-switching and language mixing (Grosjean, 1985).
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