A Focus on Adult Multicultural Neurogenics According to the U.S. Census Bureau (1990), there has been and will continue to be a steady increase in the population of ethnically /racially diverse individuals who reside within the United States. Taylor (1992)  reports that by the year 2010, one third of the American people will be people of ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 1997
A Focus on Adult Multicultural Neurogenics
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Article   |   July 01, 1997
A Focus on Adult Multicultural Neurogenics
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 1997, Vol. 3, 1-3. doi:10.1044/cds3.2.1
Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, July 1997, Vol. 3, 1-3. doi:10.1044/cds3.2.1
According to the U.S. Census Bureau (1990), there has been and will continue to be a steady increase in the population of ethnically /racially diverse individuals who reside within the United States. Taylor (1992)  reports that by the year 2010, one third of the American people will be people of color, and by 2056 the multicultural population will make up the majority of America’s citizens. This is of particular interest to neurogenics specialists because individuals from minority groups are at great risk for communication impairments and dysphagia from neurogenic etiologies (Wallace, in press). Stroke, traumatic brain injury (especially violently induced injuries), AIDS, dementia (due to specific dietary factors and exposure to environmental toxins), Lupus, alcohol and drug abuse are problems which are prevalent among many minority groups (Wallace, 1996), and problems which frequently result in communication and swallowing impairments (Wallace and Freeman, 1991). Of further interest is the fact that the decline in risk factors for neurologically-based problems, which has been observed for the population-at-large, has not been as steady among minority groups. The increase in population figures for minority groups, together with the slow decrease in risk factors suggests that minorities will constitute an increasingly large proportion of our clinical caseloads in the future.
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