An Ethnographic Investigation of African American Mothers' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication The purpose of this study was to investigate fourteen African American mothers' perceptions of the utilization of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) by their children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The authors used ethnographic methodologies to describe and interpret their experiences and perceptions. Findings suggest that AAC strategies were perceived ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
An Ethnographic Investigation of African American Mothers' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alayna Townsend
    Howard University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Washington, DC
  • Ovetta Harris
    Howard University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Washington, DC
  • Linda Bland-Stewart
    Howard University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Washington, DC
  • Disclosure: Alayna Townsend, Ovetta Harris, and Linda Bland-Stewart have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Alayna Townsend, Ovetta Harris, and Linda Bland-Stewart have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
An Ethnographic Investigation of African American Mothers' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, December 2012, Vol. 19, 84-89. doi:10.1044/cds19.3.84
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, December 2012, Vol. 19, 84-89. doi:10.1044/cds19.3.84

The purpose of this study was to investigate fourteen African American mothers' perceptions of the utilization of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) by their children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The authors used ethnographic methodologies to describe and interpret their experiences and perceptions. Findings suggest that AAC strategies were perceived as useful to meet their children's social communication needs and were beneficial in developing social communication skills.

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