Pronunciation Training Needs for Chinese and Korean Interpreters-in-Training Professional interpreters working in the English-Korean and English-Chinese combinations work in both directions; they render spoken Korean/Chinese into English and spoken English into Korean/Chinese. Graduate programs in Interpretation Studies (IS) have proliferated in Korea and China and admission to programs in these countries and the United States is competitive; pronunciation ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2013
Pronunciation Training Needs for Chinese and Korean Interpreters-in-Training
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jean Turner
    Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation, and Language Education, Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA
  • Audrey Gutierrez
    Seoul, Korea
  • Financial Disclosure: Jean Turner is a Professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Audrey Gutierrez has no financial interests related to the content of this article.
    Financial Disclosure: Jean Turner is a Professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Audrey Gutierrez has no financial interests related to the content of this article.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jean Turner has previously published in the subject area. Audrey Gutierrez has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jean Turner has previously published in the subject area. Audrey Gutierrez has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2013
Pronunciation Training Needs for Chinese and Korean Interpreters-in-Training
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, December 2013, Vol. 20, 90-100. doi:10.1044/cds20.3.90
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, December 2013, Vol. 20, 90-100. doi:10.1044/cds20.3.90

Professional interpreters working in the English-Korean and English-Chinese combinations work in both directions; they render spoken Korean/Chinese into English and spoken English into Korean/Chinese. Graduate programs in Interpretation Studies (IS) have proliferated in Korea and China and admission to programs in these countries and the United States is competitive; pronunciation accuracy is expected. However, some students fear their speech lacks the desired degree of fluency or accuracy, or they worry that the pressure of interpreting will degrade their pronunciation. Pronunciation instruction addressing the concerns of these advanced language learners should build both their confidence and substantial skills. In this article, we present the findings of an initial needs assessment. Interview data from 9 IS professors suggest that little systematic pronunciation instruction is currently provided, though individual students receive self-study direction. Interview and survey data from 3 IS graduates and 22 Korean and Chinese IS students reveal that their early language study included both intuitive-imitative and analytic-linguistic pronunciation techniques. In the final section of this article we synthesize the findings and propose practices from second language pedagogy and speech therapy that could be incorporated into pronunciation training addressing the specific needs of these language professionals.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.