Racialization of Abilities and Disabilities in U.S. Schools: Asian American Students in Gifted and Special Education Grounded in racial formations theory (Omi & Winant, 1994), this conceptual article sheds light onto Asian American students as both an underresearched population and an illustrative case to advance the view that abilities and disabilities are significantly racialized concepts in U.S. schools. We discuss two racial projects, Asian American students ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Racialization of Abilities and Disabilities in U.S. Schools: Asian American Students in Gifted and Special Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vichet Chhuon
    Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Minneapolis, MN
  • Amanda Sullivan
    Department of Educational Psychology, University of Minnesota- Twin Cities Minneapolis, MN
  • Disclosure: Vichet Chhuon and Amanda Sullivan have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Vichet Chhuon and Amanda Sullivan have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Racialization of Abilities and Disabilities in U.S. Schools: Asian American Students in Gifted and Special Education
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 49-59. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.49
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 49-59. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.49

Grounded in racial formations theory (Omi & Winant, 1994), this conceptual article sheds light onto Asian American students as both an underresearched population and an illustrative case to advance the view that abilities and disabilities are significantly racialized concepts in U.S. schools. We discuss two racial projects, Asian American students overrepresentation in gifted education and Asian American's invisibility in special education, to demonstrate the complexity and varied ways White privilege disadvantages students of color in the United States. We argue that these projects are part and parcel of larger projects in the United States that situates Asian American communities along a shifting racial continuum that preserves White privilege. Unfortunately, the model minority stereotype has been a hegemonic force that has contributed deeply to muted conversations on racial and ethnic disproportionality for many of the most underserved in the US school system.

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