Perceptions of Racial Privilege in Prospective Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists Awareness of racial disparities and privileges may be regarded as a critical component of cultural competence in speech-language-hearing professionals. In this study, 83 graduate students in speech-language pathology and audiology completed a web-based survey on their perceptions of White privilege. Both qualitative and quantitative results suggest the majority of respondents ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Perceptions of Racial Privilege in Prospective Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerry Danahy Ebert
    Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Rush University Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: Kerry Danahy Ebert has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kerry Danahy Ebert has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Perceptions of Racial Privilege in Prospective Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 60-71. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.60
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 60-71. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.60

Awareness of racial disparities and privileges may be regarded as a critical component of cultural competence in speech-language-hearing professionals. In this study, 83 graduate students in speech-language pathology and audiology completed a web-based survey on their perceptions of White privilege. Both qualitative and quantitative results suggest the majority of respondents view racial privileges as minimal in the speech-language-hearing professions; most respondents denied the concept of White privilege or showed minimal awareness. To improve the cultural competence of future speech-language hearing professionals, discussion of racial privilege should be included in training programs and in professional literature.

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