The Effects of Teaching About White Privilege in Speech-Language Pathology The ongoing development of cultural competence for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) is an issue that extends beyond certification; it is directly connected to ethical practice. As The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA, 2005) Issues in Ethics: Cultural Competence noted, “Everyone has a culture. Therefore, cultural competence is as important to successful ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
The Effects of Teaching About White Privilege in Speech-Language Pathology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janes Preis
    Loyola University MD, Baltimore, MD
  • Disclosure: Janet Preis has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Janet Preis has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2013
The Effects of Teaching About White Privilege in Speech-Language Pathology
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 72-83. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.72
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2013, Vol. 20, 72-83. doi:10.1044/cds20.2.72
The ongoing development of cultural competence for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) is an issue that extends beyond certification; it is directly connected to ethical practice. As The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA, 2005) Issues in Ethics: Cultural Competence noted, “Everyone has a culture. Therefore, cultural competence is as important to successful provision of services as are scientific, technical, and clinical knowledge and skills” (discussion section, para. 1). ASHA's Code of Ethics (2010) provides guidance regarding appropriate services to all populations following the central tenet to hold paramount the welfare of persons SLPs serve. In order to comprehensively “hold the welfare” of clients it is critical for professionals in speech-language pathology to recognize and understand the influence of one's own culture as well as inherent cultural biases. This charge requires more than just identifying and recognizing cultural patterns of the client; it requires examination of the clinician's own values and beliefs.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.