Bilingual Myth-Busters Series Language Confusion in Bilingual Children This article is the first in a series that will attempt to deconstruct myths about bilingualism. Language confusion is the popularly held belief (or myth) that children are incapable of becoming bilingual without experiencing confusion. The purpose of this article is to provide an integrative review of relevant research that ... Bilingual Myth-Busters Series
Bilingual Myth-Busters Series  |   April 01, 2013
Bilingual Myth-Busters Series Language Confusion in Bilingual Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Guiberson
    University of Wyoming, Division of Communication Disorders Laramie, WY
  • Disclosure: Financial: Mark Guiberson has no financial relationships to disclose. Nonfinancial: Guiberson serves as Editor for ASHA Special Interest Group 14’s Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations.
    Disclosure: Financial: Mark Guiberson has no financial relationships to disclose. Nonfinancial: Guiberson serves as Editor for ASHA Special Interest Group 14’s Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity
Bilingual Myth-Busters Series   |   April 01, 2013
Bilingual Myth-Busters Series Language Confusion in Bilingual Children
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, April 2013, Vol. 20, 5-14. doi:10.1044/cds20.1.5
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, April 2013, Vol. 20, 5-14. doi:10.1044/cds20.1.5

This article is the first in a series that will attempt to deconstruct myths about bilingualism. Language confusion is the popularly held belief (or myth) that children are incapable of becoming bilingual without experiencing confusion. The purpose of this article is to provide an integrative review of relevant research that sheds light on the existence of language confusion. To better understand bilingual language development, the author describes theoretical frameworks of bilingualism. Next, the article provides a cursory review of research that is relevant to the concept of language confusion. Topics include infant processing skills, bilingual toddlers ability to separate and use languages, code-mixing, bilinguals cross-linguistic transfer abilities, and bilingualism in disordered populations. In conclusion, this integrative literature review revealed no evidence to support the existence of language confusion in bilingual children. Finally, the author highlights several research findings and summarizing points that may help providers in future conversations with families and colleagues when planning assessment, intervention, and programming for children from linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.