Grammaticality of Preschoolers in Narratives: Considering the Influences of Bilingualism and Daycare Participation: A Retrospective and Exploratory Study Purpose: The current retrospective and exploratory study aimed to identify the role of language experience for monolingual and bilingual preschool age children who did and did not attend daycare on the production of grammatical utterances during a narrative task. Method: Eighty-eight preschool age children (M=4; 10, SD=4 months), a subset ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2014
Grammaticality of Preschoolers in Narratives: Considering the Influences of Bilingualism and Daycare Participation: A Retrospective and Exploratory Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Resendiz
    Department of Communication Disorders, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
  • Rachel Henrich
    Student, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
    Bilingual Language Accquisition Bunch Lab, San Antonio, TX
  • Celeste Domsch
    Department of Communication Disorders, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
  • Elizabeth Belasco
    Department of Communication Disorders, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX
  • Financial Disclosure: Maria Resendiz is an Assistant Professor at Texas State University. Rachel Henrich is a senior at Texas State University. She is also an Undergraduate Research Assistant at Bilingual Language Accquisition Bunch Lab. Celeste Domsch is an Assistant Professor at Texas State University. Elizabeth Belasco is a Statistical Consultant at Texas State University and owner of E. B. Consultants.
    Financial Disclosure: Maria Resendiz is an Assistant Professor at Texas State University. Rachel Henrich is a senior at Texas State University. She is also an Undergraduate Research Assistant at Bilingual Language Accquisition Bunch Lab. Celeste Domsch is an Assistant Professor at Texas State University. Elizabeth Belasco is a Statistical Consultant at Texas State University and owner of E. B. Consultants.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Maria Resendiz has previously published in the subject area. Rachel Henrich has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Celeste Domsch has previously published in the subject area. Elizabeth Belasco has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Maria Resendiz has previously published in the subject area. Rachel Henrich has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Celeste Domsch has previously published in the subject area. Elizabeth Belasco has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2014
Grammaticality of Preschoolers in Narratives: Considering the Influences of Bilingualism and Daycare Participation: A Retrospective and Exploratory Study
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, April 2014, Vol. 21, 22-32. doi:10.1044/cds21.1.22
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, April 2014, Vol. 21, 22-32. doi:10.1044/cds21.1.22

Purpose: The current retrospective and exploratory study aimed to identify the role of language experience for monolingual and bilingual preschool age children who did and did not attend daycare on the production of grammatical utterances during a narrative task.

Method: Eighty-eight preschool age children (M=4; 10, SD=4 months), a subset of children from a larger study (Resendiz, in preparation), participated in the current study. Parent interviews were completed to obtain background information about each child (Gutierrez-Clellen & Kreiter, 2003). Each child produced narratives using wordless picture books in the language of their choice. Five children produced a narrative in both English and Spanish; for these children we used their higher grammaticality score. Narratives were transcribed and each utterance was coded as grammatical or ungrammatical.

Results: There were no significant differences between children who were bilingual and children who were monolingual. There were also no significant differences between children who attended daycare and those who did not.

Conclusion: Coming from a bilingual background did not hinder children's performance in the area of grammaticality. Participation in daycare did not influence children's use of grammatical language. While there are other documented benefits of daycare participation, grammaticality is not an affected area of language.

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