Access to Speech-Language Pathology Services for African-American Clients with Aphasia: A Qualitative Study The purpose of this article is to report the perceptions and experiences of family members of five African-American clients with aphasia as they accessed speech-language pathology services. Client or family responses to a survey and during a semi-structured, ethnographic interview revealed information on barriers and facilitators influencing access to speech ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2014
Access to Speech-Language Pathology Services for African-American Clients with Aphasia: A Qualitative Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nidhi Mahendra
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Julianne Spicer
    Center for Student Research, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Article
Article   |   August 01, 2014
Access to Speech-Language Pathology Services for African-American Clients with Aphasia: A Qualitative Study
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2014, Vol. 21, 53-62. doi:10.1044/cds21.2.53
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2014, Vol. 21, 53-62. doi:10.1044/cds21.2.53

The purpose of this article is to report the perceptions and experiences of family members of five African-American clients with aphasia as they accessed speech-language pathology services. Client or family responses to a survey and during a semi-structured, ethnographic interview revealed information on barriers and facilitators influencing access to speech therapy services. These data are part of a larger investigation into cultural and linguistic barriers that might influence racial and/or ethnic minority clients’ awareness of, access to, and utilization of speech-language pathology services. Results reveal the presence of distinct barriers and facilitators that can influence timely, sustained access to speech-language pathology services for African-American clients and their families. These data have critical implications for speech-language pathologists (SLPs), audiologists, and all healthcare providers.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.