Building an Inclusive, Accessible, and Responsive Campus at California State University East Bay, 2010-2015 California State University East Bay (CSUEB), opened in 1959 with 300 students on one campus. Since then, it has grown to serve over 14,000 students on three campuses. The motto of our university is “Per Aspera Ad Astra”, or “Through Adversity to the Stars”. This is an apt motto given ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2015
Building an Inclusive, Accessible, and Responsive Campus at California State University East Bay, 2010-2015
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dianne Rush Woods
    Office of Diversity, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Sarah Taylor
    Department of Social Work, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Duke Austin
    Department of Sociology and Social Services, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Julie Beck
    Department of Criminal Justice, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Ken Chung
    Department of Management, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Stephanie Couch
    Institute for STEM Education, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • E. Maxwell Davis
    Department of Human Development, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Bryan Fauth
    College Link Program, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Kim Geron
    Department of Political Science, California State University, East Bay , Hayward, CA
  • Dale Katherine Ireland
    Department of English, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Eric Kupers
    Department of Theatre and Dance, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Michael S. Massey
    Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Amy June Rowley
    Department of Modern Language Literatures, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Julie Stein
    Department of Educational Effectiveness Services, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Jessica Weiss
    Office of Faculty Development, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA
  • Financial Disclosure: The authors of this article have no financial interest related to the content of this article.
    Financial Disclosure: The authors of this article have no financial interest related to the content of this article.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: The authors of this article have no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: The authors of this article have no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2015
Building an Inclusive, Accessible, and Responsive Campus at California State University East Bay, 2010-2015
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2015, Vol. 22, 44-63. doi:10.1044/cds22.2.44
History: Received May 7, 2015 , Revised August 4, 2015 , Accepted August 4, 2015
SIG 14 Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations, August 2015, Vol. 22, 44-63. doi:10.1044/cds22.2.44
History: Received May 7, 2015; Revised August 4, 2015; Accepted August 4, 2015

California State University East Bay (CSUEB), opened in 1959 with 300 students on one campus. Since then, it has grown to serve over 14,000 students on three campuses. The motto of our university is “Per Aspera Ad Astra”, or “Through Adversity to the Stars”. This is an apt motto given that our university is the most racially and ethnically diverse campus in the continental United States (The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2014), and 61% of our undergraduate students are the first in their families to earn a college degree (Office of Institutional Research, personal communication, March 9, 2015). Our students are also highly diverse in terms of age, ability status, parenting experience, immigration background, sexual orientation, gender, religion, and much more. Though the diversity of our campus provides ample opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to be exposed to multiple perspectives, we have learned that intentional efforts are required to build an inclusive, accessible, and responsive community.

This article describes strategies we have employed over the past five years across three broad areas: (a) support for student learning, engagement, and retention; (b) professional development; and (c) policies around inclusion and access. Preliminary evaluation of these efforts suggests that we have made significant progress in building an inclusive campus that supports student learning, respects all members of the campus community, and facilitates our continuing engagement in this work.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Christine Irwin for her detailed editorial assistance, Jodi Servatius for her support on the DSJ Assessment section, and Diana Balgas, Melissa Cervantes, and Lettie Ramirez for the information they provided for the GANAS section.
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